Latest News:  
Beijing   Cloudy    33 / 24   City Forecast

Home>>China Society

Decision to slow trains met with mixed response

(China Daily)

10:56, August 12, 2011

BEIJING - The State Council's decision to slow the operating speeds of China's high-speed trains on Wednesday is receiving a tepid welcome from many Chinese.

The safety of the railways was brought into question when a high-speed train crashed into another on a line near Wenzhou in Zhejiang on July 23. The accident has been blamed on faulty signaling equipment.

At a meeting presided over by Premier Wen Jiabao shortly after the crash, the State Council ordered safety checks to be conducted on both high-speed railways and those that convey trains at slower speeds.

That decision made headlines across the country and soon gave rise to fixed feelings among many in the public.

Zhou Yiwen, an employee of the Hunan Tangel Publishing Co, wrote on his micro blog: "I feel a little relieved, and I have faith in the government's measures. I hope it is not too late to fix this problem."

A Beijing taxi driver surnamed Li expressed similar sentiments. "It's good news, since I'll feel safe with the trains running at slower speeds," he said. "But I do hope that they (the Railway Ministry) can eliminate hazards so a disaster like this won't happen again."

Sun Zhang, a professor at the Railway and Urban Mass Transit Research Institute of Tongji University, also said he supports the new policy.

"We should take time to test the high-speed rail system and gain more experience, because that will provide an important reference for the future operation of these trains at high speeds," Sun said.

"It took Japan 47 years to increase the speed of its Shinkansen railway network, going from 210 km an hour in 1964 to 300 km an hour in 2011. So it's impressive, and at the same time a bit worrisome, that China managed to achieve speeds of 350 km an hour in just seven years."

Others, though, doubt that slower speeds will produce the desired results.

"I don't think it will work, since the actual cause of the crash is unknown," a netizen using the screenname dayushuomanhua said in a micro blog post. "We don't know if the train speed had anything to do with the crash, so slowing the speed of the trains is like barking up the wrong tree."

Sheng Guangzu, the minister of railways, said that railways with a maximum speed of 350 km an hour will run at 300 km an hour and those with a maximum speed of 250 km an hour will run at 200 km an hour. He said railways whose speeds have been lifted to 200 km an hour will be slowed to 160 km an hour.

Ticket fares will be reduced accordingly, he said.

Meanwhile, in response to the State Council's decision, the transport bureau of the Ministry of Railways has started making a new train schedule. The schedule will slow the speed of the new high-speed railways in the initial stages of their operation.

While some are raising doubts about the reduced train speeds, others want the trains to be allowed to run faster in the future.

A netizen going by the name yuanlianqishi wrote in a micro blog post: "I hope slowing the trains will be a temporary thing. I think after better safety measures and personnel training are put into effect, the train speeds will increase again."

【1】 【2】

Email|Print|Comments(Editor:梁军)

Leave your comment0 comments

  1. Name

  

Selections for you


  1. Xinjiang village's exports to Europe

  2. Youth sports stay strong in China

  3. Yunnan town with Islamic flavor

  4. 'Luoyang' missile frigate returns to harbor

Most Popular

Opinions

  1. London rioting ignited by what?
  2. Does a perfect political system exist?
  3. Why should the US be immune from criticism?
  4. Putting the rail system back on track
  5. Not all WTO members are equal
  6. Catholicism should adapt to local conditions
  7. Draft may expand lawsuits against government
  8. China to strengthen grassland ecology protection
  9. Arms sale to Taiwan no longer US 'trump card'
  10. Keeping a cool head amid global unrest

What's happening in China

Chinese president meets UNESCO head

  1. Legendary Chinese judge has a case against popular Starbucks coffee mugs
  2. EU, Chinese youths discuss participation in policy-making
  3. Bush's memoir foresees improvement in U.S.-China relations
  4. China's new aircraft carrier no threat to power balance: Russian expert

PD Online Data

  1. The Tartar ethnic minority
  2. The Xibe ethnic minority
  3. The Miao ethnic minority
  4. The Maonan ethnic minority
  5. The Lahu ethnic minority