Latest News:  
Beijing   Cloudy/Sunny    28 / 19   City Forecast

Home>>China Politics

New leader of Tibetan "gov't-in-exile" disqualified for talks

(Xinhua)

08:57, September 01, 2011

TOKYO, Aug. 31 (Xinhua) -- The newly-elected leader of the illegal Tibetan "government-in-exile" is not qualified for negotiations with the Chinese central government, a visiting Tibetologist said in Tokyo Wednesday.

Dr. Dramdul, deputy director-general of China Tibetology Research Center, said he has learned Lobsang Sangay, a Harvard- trained legal scholar sworn in as the new leader of the Tibetan " government-in-exile" and said he was willing to negotiate with the Chinese government "any time, anywhere".

"China already made it very clear a few years ago that the central government is open to talks with personal representatives of Dalai Lama, not representatives from the government-in-exile," Dramdul said at a press conference held at the Chinese Embassy in Tokyo. "And the negotiation will never be about the status of Tibet, but about the future of Dalai Lama and the people around him. This policy has not changed."

He added the "government-in-exile" is illegal and has not been acknowledged officially by any government since its existence.

"No matter how the leadership (of the government-in-exile) changes, the key to improve contact with the central government is to sincerely abandon separatist moves," Dramdul said.

Regarding the reincarnation of Dalai Lama, Dramdul said the reincarnation institution of Dalai Lama and Panchen Lama, following a strict set of religious practices, has been carried on for several hundred years, and all the 14 generations of Dalai Lama has been acknowledged by the central government of China.

Dramdul is heading a delegation of Chinese Tibetologists and Tibetan Living Buddhas to Japan, where Buddhism is the principal religion.

"The Sino-Japanese exchanges are making progress these years. It is against this backdrop that we would like to deepen communication with Japanese Buddhism circles, as well as with Japanese politicians and media to help China's Tibet get better understood," Dramdul said.

Email|Print|Comments(Editor:燕勐)

Leave your comment0 comments

  1. Name

  

Selections for you


  1. Last day of Chinese railway travel season

  2. 68th Venice Int'l Film Festival about to begin

  3. Spanish painted red in annual tomato fight

  4. Gnus migrate across Mara River in Kenya

Most Popular

Opinions

  1. School shutdown couldn't be good-willed
  2. Tokyo asked to pursue policy consistency
  3. US urged to halt criticisms of China's military buildup
  4. Libya needs its own development path
  5. NATO faces 'catastrophic success' in Libya
  6. China's 'hardware' aid to Africa makes sense
  7. Population bomb ticks to our peril
  8. Fall of Qaddafi poses challenge for China, Russia
  9. Message from Manila as Aquino III visits
  10. Economic storm casts pall on Sarkozy's China visit

What's happening in China

Bodyguards trained to protect the rich

  1. Chinese Muslims celebrate end of Ramadan
  2. Fire burns PetroChina boss
  3. Factory fire sets residential building ablaze
  4. Rules for food safety management in restaurants
  5. Emergency response to fight drought issued

PD Online Data

  1. The Yi ethnic minority
  2. The Salar ethnic minority
  3. The Tu ethnic minority
  4. The Pumi ethnic minority
  5. The Naxi ethnic minority