Latest News:  
Beijing   Sunny    4 / -8   City Forecast

People's Daily Online>>Life & Culture

Chinese Yue Opera artist: Wu Fenghua

(Xinhua)

13:08, February 09, 2012

Wu Fenghua (1st L) instructs a young actress backstage during a night show in Shengzhou, east China's Zhejiang Province, Jan. 28, 2012.(Xinhua/Cui Xinyu)

Niuniu started to cry out of loud when his mother was leaving for a week-long cruise performance during the Spring Festival holidays, a traditional family gathering time for Chinese families. The mother of the four-year-old boy Wu Fenghua, a star actor of Xiaobaihua Shaoxing Opera Troupe in Shaoxing, was busy acting for local farmers around villages at the Chinese Lunar New Year, as a traditional celebration of over 25 years since the founding of the Troupe in 1986.

As a two-time winner of the Plum Blossom Award, the highest theatrical award in China, middle-aged Wu Fenghua has no advantage in working conditions compared with her young fellows. She travels hours on bus to transfer from villages to villages, making up herself in a shabby farmhouse, waiting long time with thin but delicate costumes on backstage, and finally singing in a chilly winter night on a makeshift theater made by scaffolds and wood block and covered with plastic cloth above. This is rather a usual routine for Ms. Wu.

Since Yue Opera enjoys great popularity in south and east part of China, Wu and his young fellows has to give some 150 performances per year in rural areas hoping to share with local Chinese people this graceful art form by singing with soft, sweet tunes and melodies of gentle and refined style. Shaoxing Opera, or Yue Opera, is a major Chinese opera form founded around 1906 in south China. It was named "Yue Opera" because it has its origin in part of Yue State in the Spring and Autumn Period dating back about 2,000 years ago. Off work Ms. Wu obliges to offer technical instructions to younger generations of actresses not only on singing but also body training sessions. She says she has spent even more time with her students rather than her own son. "Niuniu, I am going back as soon as possible after two shows in this village." Wu Fenghua called her son on the bus journey to Yueqing village, one day ahead of China's Lantern Festival, also the last day of the Spring Festival holidays.

【1】 【2】 【3】 【4】 【5】 【6】 【7】 【8】 【9】 【10】
【11】

Email|Print|Comments(Editor:王莉莉)

Leave your comment0 comments

  1. Name

  

Selections for you


  1. White lions play in the snow

  2. Third art work exhibition of college students

  3. Entrance examination at Beijing Film Academy

  4. South Korea holds annual military winter drill

Most Popular

Opinions

  1. Why China vetoes UN draft resolution for Syria issue
  2. Syria becomes focus of struggle among big powers
  3. Preventing UNSC from becoming a rubber stamp
  4. Drums of war beating again in Middle East
  5. American society at crossroads
  6. Values are thin excuses to start new wars
  7. Li Ning to lower costs, improve effeciency
  8. EU cannot act as sole toll bearer of the skies
  9. Avoiding civil war in Syria
  10. Trade essential for growth

What's happening in China

Central bank: No cats on 100-yuan note

  1. Water OK after leak from cargo ship
  2. Micro blog policy unclear for overseas users
  3. Sandy weather strands 600 at Lhasa airport
  4. Buddhist temple offers e-blessing service
  5. Public asked to name model police officers

PD Online Data

  1. Spring Festival
  2. Chinese ethnic odyssey
  3. Yangge in Shaanxi
  4. Gaoqiao in Northern China
  5. The drum dance in Ansai