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English>>China Business

Yuan set to be more flexible

By Wang Xiaotian  (China Daily)

08:12, October 31, 2012

A worker counts renminbi banknotes at a rural credit cooperative in Linyi, Shandong province. The yuan has appreciated by more than 2.4 percent since late July, when it touched 6.3967, its weakest point for the year. [Photo/China Daily]

China might, in the last two months of the year, further broaden the permitted fluctuation limits of the yuan to the daily mid-point set by the central bank, analysts forecast.

"We expect such fluctuation limits to be extended from the current 1 percent to 2.5 percent after the United States presidential election, and the 18th National Congress of the Communist Party of China (due to start on Nov 8)," said Lu Zhengwei, chief economist at the Industrial Bank.

He said interest rates and banks' reserve requirement ratio are unlikely to be adjusted in November given the current economic situation.

Li Wei, an economist at Standard Chartered Bank, said: "No one can rule out the possibility that the trading band is further widened. Such a move would send a strong signal to the market that the yuan is further liberalized and more market-driven.

"This would also be in line with China's long-term economic reform in a bid to improve market efficiency."

He declined to comment on the possible timing for such a move, but said a more flexible yuan will eventually come about and Chinese businesses will have to adapt to this change and come up with better business practices.

Chen Daofu, policy research chief of the Financial Research Institute at the State Council's Development Research Center, said: "The current fluctuation limits already seem sufficient for the market."

He said broadening the yuan's range depends on the demand of market players, and if market forces demonstrate greater appetite for trading in the currency, such a decision might follow.

The People's Bank of China, the central bank, announced in April that the yuan would be allowed to fluctuate by 1 percent from a daily mid-point - double the previous 0.5 percent.

Since then, the currency has depreciated against the dollar while the world's second-largest economy slowed for seven consecutive quarters, before starting to pick up in recent months as it stabilizes and major economies such the US, the European Union, the United Kingdom and Japan announced new easing policies.

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