Beijing traffic regulation fails to ease jams

16:58, April 13, 2010      

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Beijing is asking residents to start work later in an attempt to ease traffic jams during rush hour. But after the Monday morning commute most people say they observed little difference.

More than 800,000 Beijing residents have been asked to push their start time at work back by half an hour to alleviate the city's notorious traffic jams.

Beijing's party and government departments, state-owned enterprises, institutions and social groups had their work hours changed from 8:30 am to 5:30 pm to from 9am to 6pm.

The new rule does not apply to central state institutions in Beijing, schools, hospitals and large shopping centers.

Traffic authorities claim vehicle flows declined compared to previous Monday mornings. But citizens say they could barely notice any difference.

At Beijing Second Experimental Elementary School, the traffic police had problems diverting cars driven by anxious parents taking their kids to class.

Bus stops and subway stations are getting more crowded, as more commuters are travelling in rush hour. Before the policy came into effect, employees hired by private businesses had been working from 9am to 6pm. The new policy means more competition for less space on the road to work.

The adoption of the new policy came after Beijing's latest move to clear the city's congested roads, often packed with four million cars each day.

Other measures include doubling parking fees in key areas and banning motorists from driving for one day every week.


Beijing is asking residents to start work later in an attempt to ease traffic jams during rush hour. But after the Monday morning commute most people say they observed little difference.

Source: CCTV. com

(Editor:王寒露)

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