Study shows "significant" gender pay gap in New Zealand

16:17, March 08, 2010      

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A new study of graduates with bachelor degrees in New Zealand revealed that men start earning more than women one year after starting work.

Women's Affairs Minister Pansy Wong said on Monday that her ministry's study used data from Inland Revenue and looked at the difference between the income of male and female graduates between one and five years after they started their employment.

The pay gap started developing from the first year, and after five years it ranged between 1 percent and 20 percent, with the biggest difference in management and commerce.

Pansy Wong said the findings of the study have established a clear difference in income between men and women who graduate within the same fields of study after five years, varying from just one percent for graduates in society and culture to 20 percent for graduates in management and commerce.

"While the income gap varies between different fields of study, no matter what area of study is pursued an income gap has emerged between men and women after five years, and it is quite a significant gap," Wong said in a press release on Monday.

"While the income gap varies between different fields of study, no matter what area of study is pursued an income gap has emerged between men and women ... and it is quite a significant gap," she said.

"The bottom line is that a bachelor's degree held by a woman should be worth the same in the marketplace as one held by a man," she added.

Source: Xinhua
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