Text Version
RSS Feeds
Newsletter
Home Forum Photos Features Newsletter Archive Employment
About US Help Site Map
SEARCH   About US FAQ Site Map Site News
  SERVICES
  -Text Version
  -RSS Feeds
  -Newsletter
  -News Archive
  -Give us feedback
  -Voices of Readers
  -Online community
  -China Biz info
  What's new
 -
 -
Study: Migraine cuts breast cancer risk by 30 percent
+ -
13:17, November 07, 2008

 Related News
 Egypt retrieves smuggled antiquities from Spain
 WHO: Traditional medicine an important part of China's health system
 China to fly flag for South at summit
 Model way to cut emissions
 Thailand begins new anti-drug suppression
 Comment  Tell A Friend
 Print Format  Save Article
Women who suffer from migraines may take at least some comfort in a recent, first-of-its-kind study that suggests a history of such headaches is associated with a significantly lower risk of breast cancer.

A research team at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington, reported the findings in the November issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention.

"We found that, overall, women who had a history of migraines had a 30 percent lower risk of breast cancer compared to women who did not have a history of such headaches," said the authors. The findings may point to new ways of reducing a woman's risk for breast cancer, they said.

In particular, a history of migraines appears to reduce the risk of the most common subtypes of breast cancer: those that are estrogen-receptor and/or progesterone-receptor positive. Such tumors have estrogen and/or progesterone receptors, or docking sites, on the surface of their cells, which makes them more responsive to hormone-blocking drugs than tumors that lack such receptors.

The biological mechanism behind the association between migraines and breast cancer is not fully known, but researchers suspect that it has to do with fluctuations in levels of circulating hormones.

Migraines seem to have a hormonal component in that they occur more frequently in women than in men, and some of their known triggers are associated with hormones, the authors said.

While these results need to be interpreted with caution, they point to a possible new factor that may be related to breast-cancer risk. "This gives us a new avenue to explore the biology behind risk reduction. Hopefully this could help stimulate other ideas and extend what we know about the biology of breast cancer," the authors said.

Source: Xinhua



  Your Message:   Most Commented:
30th Anniversary of China's Reform and Opening-up
World's largest pinata unveiled in Philadelphia 
Half-ton Mexican man dies after pleading for help
All samples tested free from melamine in Hong Kong
U.S. economy contracts by 0.3% in third quarter

|About Peopledaily.com.cn | Advertise on site | Contact us | Site map | Job offer|
Copyright by People's Daily Online, All Rights Reserved

http://english.people.com.cn/90001/90782/6529438.pdf