China to cap nonferrous metals production

09:26, July 26, 2010      

Email | Print | Subscribe | Comments | Forum 

China will limit its combined output of 10 nonferrous metals, which includes metals like copper, lead and aluminum, to 41 million tons per year by 2015, said Shang Fushan, deputy head of the China Nonferrous Metals Industry Association (CNMIA).

Other metals that will be limited under the regulations are zinc, nickel, tin, antimony, magnesium, sponge titanium and mercury.

Analysts pointed out that the plan provides limited room for the expansion of China's nonferrous metal sector's production capacity.

Today's China Securities Journal quoted a source close to policymakers who said that the development of the rare metal sector will form a separate part in China's 12th Five-Year Plan.

The source disclosed that the plan for the rare metal sector will include production of tungsten, molybdenum, tin, antimony and rare earth metals.

According to the estimation of the industry association, China's apparent consumption of copper, aluminum, lead and zinc will be 8.3 million tons, 24 million tons, 5 million tons and 6.5 million tons, respectively.

The nonferrous metal industry should make best use of mining resources both home and abroad, control expansion of production capacity and eliminate outdated production, according to the industrial 12th five-year plan formulated by the CNMIA.

By Qi Shuwen, People's Daily Online

(Editor:祁澍文)

  • Do you have anything to say?

双语词典
dictionary

  
Special Coverage
  • Premier Wen Jiabao visits Hungary, Britain, Germany
  • From drought to floods
Major headlines
Editor's Pick
  • A Long March-2FT1 carrier rocket loaded with Tiangong-1 unmanned space lab module blasts off from the launch pad at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China's Gansu Province, Sept. 29, 2011. Commander-in-chief of China's manned space program Chang Wanquan announced Thursday night that the launch of Tiangong-1 space lab module was successful. (Xinhua/Wang Jianmin)
  • A Long March-2FT1 carrier rocket loaded with Tiangong-1 unmanned space lab module blasts off from the launch pad at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China's Gansu Province, Sept. 29, 2011. (Xinhua/Wang Jianmin)
  • The graphics shows 3 steps of Chinese space rendezvous and docking. (Xinhua/Lu Zhe)
  • A Long March-2FT1 carrier rocket loaded with Tiangong-1 unmanned space lab module blasts off from the launch pad at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China's Gansu Province, Sept. 29, 2011. (Xinhua/Wang Jianmin)
  • Chinese President Hu Jintao watches the launch of Tiangong-1 space lab module at Beijing Aerospace Control Center in Beijing, capital of China, Sept. 29, 2011. Other members of the Standing Committee of the Political Bureau of the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee, including Wu Bangguo, Jia Qinglin, Li Changchun, Xi Jinping, Li Keqiang and Zhou Yongkang, are also present. (Xinhua/Rao Aimin)
  • The graphics shows the launch procedures of the carrier rocket of Tiangong-1 space lab module, Long March-2FT1 on Sept. 29, 2011. (Xinhua/Lu Zhe)
Hot Forum Discussion