U.S.-Russia nuke treaty stirs heated debate (2)

15:12, July 24, 2010      

Email | Print | Subscribe | Comments | Forum 

Critics fret the treaty will limit U.S. ballistic missile defenses and give Russia an advantage, but Scowcroft said opponents' criticisms revolve around what the agreement does not contain, rather than what it does.

"The treaty makes no provision for the maintenance of our deterrence capability, not should it," he said at a speech in Washington.

"To me it remains essential that our strategic nuclear capability be safe, reliable and capable. But that is a unilateral U.S. requirement quite apart from the treaty," he said. "And those who say it ought to be a part of a pre-condition are mixing apples and oranges."

New START is not designed to move the disarmament process forward, but rather to preserve a mutually acceptable format for negotiation, he said.

"Yes, it reduces the number of forces on each side by a very modest amount," he said. "But what it was designed to do was preserve the structure within which we have operated that gives both sides the confidence that we are both talking the same way," he said.

Still, some critics said what the treaty does not include are just as important as what it does.

Ariel Cohen, senior research fellow at the Heritage Foundation, expressed concern over new START's failure to account for Russia's arsenal.

The treaty also leaves out language concerning mobile Russian rail-based Inter Continental Ballistic Missiles and launchers, he wrote on the organization's website. But other experts counter that those systems fall under the definition of other missiles and launchers that it does does ban.


【1】 【2】 【3】

(Editor:李牧(实习))

  • Do you have anything to say?

双语词典
dictionary

  
Special Coverage
  • Premier Wen Jiabao visits Hungary, Britain, Germany
  • From drought to floods
Major headlines
Editor's Pick
  • A Long March-2FT1 carrier rocket loaded with Tiangong-1 unmanned space lab module blasts off from the launch pad at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China's Gansu Province, Sept. 29, 2011. Commander-in-chief of China's manned space program Chang Wanquan announced Thursday night that the launch of Tiangong-1 space lab module was successful. (Xinhua/Wang Jianmin)
  • Chinese President Hu Jintao watches the launch of Tiangong-1 space lab module at Beijing Aerospace Control Center in Beijing, capital of China, Sept. 29, 2011. Other members of the Standing Committee of the Political Bureau of the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee, including Wu Bangguo, Jia Qinglin, Li Changchun, Xi Jinping, Li Keqiang and Zhou Yongkang, are also present. (Xinhua/Rao Aimin)
  • The graphics shows the launch procedures of the carrier rocket of Tiangong-1 space lab module, Long March-2FT1 on Sept. 29, 2011. (Xinhua/Lu Zhe)
  • Image taken from Beijing Aerospace Control Center shows a Long March-2FT1 carrier rocket loaded with Tiangong-1 unmanned space lab module blasting off from the launch pad at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China's Gansu Province, Sept. 29, 2011. (Xinhua)
  • On Sept. 28, tourists travel around the Mingshashan Scenic Area in Dunhuang, Gansu province by camel. With the National Day vacation right around the corner, more and more tourists from home and abroad are going to Dunhuang. Riding on a camel, they travel in the desert to enjoy the cities rare form of natural scenery. (Xinhua/Zhang Weixian)
  • Chinese forest armed forces work together with forest firefighters on Sept. 28. (Xinhua/Chai Liren)
Hot Forum Discussion