Two terror suspects produced before Oslo court

10:26, July 13, 2010      

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Defending lawyer (R) for Michael Davud, a 39-year-old Uygur origin terror suspect, is interviewed at a court in Oslo, Norway, July 12, 2010. Two of the three terror suspects who were arrested on July 8 in coordinated police operations in Norway and Germany were produced before an Oslo District court on Monday. The first court hearing of this case, which was held behind the closed doors on Monday afternoon, was conducted after the public prosecutor asked for the two accused being given remand in full custody for eight weeks to facilitate further investigation. (Xinhua/Li Guorong)

Two of the three terror suspects who were arrested on July 8 in coordinated police operations in Norway and Germany were produced before an Oslo District court on Monday.

The first court hearing of this case, which was held behind the closed doors on Monday afternoon, was conducted after the public prosecutor asked for the two accused being given remand in full custody for eight weeks to facilitate further investigation.

Lawyers for the two defendants told reporters that both their clients, whose cases were being heard separately, were opposed to the requested remand in custody.

Kjell Dahl, defending lawyer for David Jackobsen, a 31-year-old Uzbek man, said that his client had been cooperating with the Norwegian police security service PST for over half a year before he was arrested last week.

He called the police on Nov. 20, 2009 when he realized what was going to happen, and acted as an informant to the police after that, meeting PST agents regularly,almost once a week, Dahl said.

Public Prosecutor Signe Kathrine Aalling, when interviewed by reporters after the conclusion of the afternoon hearing, admitted that the defendant Jackobsen had been meeting with PST agents.

But she said the accused had never told the police about the fact that he bought the hydrogen peroxide, a fluid of volatile nature which could be used to make a bomb.

The public prosecutor also refused to say anything about the scope and content or the value of the information Jackobsen gave to the police.

The other defendant was 39-year-old Michael Davud, a man of Uygur origin. He was charged as the ringleader of the three-men terror group for planning a bombing attack on undecided Norwegian targets.

The Uygur came to Norway in the late 1990s and was granted citizenship in 2007.

The third member of the terror group, which police said was connected to the al-Qaeda, was arrested in Germany on the same day. He is an Iraqi Kurdish.

The PST authorities said that the Iraqi man will be extradited soon to Norway for interrogation and trial.


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(Editor:张茜)

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