Killers of 2 foreign media persons not yet identified: Thai officials

19:36, August 23, 2010      

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Autopsies on two foreign journalists recently killed while reporting on the Bangkok protests have confirmed they died from "high-speed bullets" but failed to identify the killers, Thai officials said Monday.

"From the autopsies we can conclude that both died from high- speed bullets," DSI Deputy Director-General Naras Savestanan told a press conference.

Naras said "but we still don't know who killed them."

Japanese cameraman Hiro Muramoto died on April 10 during a street battle between Thai troops and anti-government protesters on Ratchdamnoen Avenue, in the old part of Thailand's capital Bangkok.

Italian free-lance photographer Fabio Polenghi died on May 19 during a government crackdown on anti-government protesters at the commercial Ratchprasong Avenue in central Bangkok.

The Department of Special Investigation (DSI), Thailand's Justice Ministry, was tasked with investigating their deaths and those of some 89 Thai nationals who also died in violent clashes and crackdowns between April 10 and May 19.

Source:Xinhua

(Editor:黄蓓蓓)

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