China's discipline watchdog opens doors to foreign diplomats

14:13, April 13, 2011      

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Officials of CPC Central Commission for Discipline Inspection introduce their work to visiting foreign diplomats on April 12. (Photo by Zhao Yongqi, People's Daily Overseas Edition)

On April 12, the CPC Central Commission for Discipline Inspection threw its doors open to the international community in an effort to help the world to better understand China's effort to build a clean government and fight against corruption.

It is something to which diplomats have been long looking forward, said Seyoum Mesfin, Ethiopian Ambassador to China.

This is the first open day for foreign diplomats in China held by the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Commission for Discipline Inspection (CCDI). It invited nearly 50 diplomats from more than 40 countries to catch a close glimpse of the CCDI and learn about the progress of the Party's anti-corruption efforts.

The CCDI is the top discipline inspection organ of the CPC. The predecessor of the CCDI is the Central Control Commission, which was set up as early as in 1927. The current CCDI, serving for a five-year term, was elected by the 17th National Congress of the CPC held in October 2007.


It is the first time for foreign diplomats in China to catch a close glimpse of CPC's top discipline inspection organ. (Photo by Zhao Yongqi, People's Daily Overseas Edition)

The commission's key tasks include checking the implementation of the lines and principles of the Party and supervising the exercise of power by Party members holding leading positions.

Wu Yuliang, secretary-general of the CCDI, introduced issues on fighting corruption. In 2010, the Party's disciplinary watchdogs placed 139,621 cases on file and settled 139,482 cases, resulting in Party or government disciplinary sanctions of 146,517 people and 5,373 prosecutions.

Currently, the CCDI has established friendly relations with anti-corruption authorities in nearly 80 countries and regions. It signed cooperation agreements with administrative inspection and anti-corruption authorities in Egypt, Poland and Russia and set up a regular consultation mechanism with the United States, said Wu Yuliang.

The diplomats' visit lasted two hours, and they gave high appraisals to the opening day.

Mural Salim Esenli, Turkish Ambassador to China, said he was most interested in what China's top leaders think about corruption, and he found that China adopted different, targeted policies at different periods.

By Ye Xin, People's Daily Online
 
 
     
 
 
 
     
 
 
 
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