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Snow-stranded Chinese couples hold wedding ceremonies on the road
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08:27, February 02, 2008

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For Chinese, wedding ceremonies should be held on good occasion that promises auspiciousness. But for couples stranded by the biggest snowfall to hit China in five decades, "I do" seems more lasting and meaningful on the road.

Wu Haifeng, a young man from southwest China's Sichuan province, met Shenzhen girl Lu Yixiang two years ago. They planned to hold the wedding ceremony in Wu's hometown Shi'an on January 27.

According to Chinese tradition, before a wedding, a bridegroom has to pick up a bride from her family and take her to the ceremony. However, since nowadays so many couple's homes are too far away from each other's, a restaurant room is often booked as the bridegroom's temporary home for a wedding.

Wu and Lu decided to book a hotel room in nearby Liangping County in Sichuan.

On the afternoon of Jan. 26, Lu settled down at Liangping County, waiting for Wu to pick her up the next day.

Heavy snow fell during the night and caused traffic jams. Luckily, Wu chose a detour and finally made it to Liangping with his friends. With almost no time to lose, Wu escorted his beloved onto the train back home at 3 p.m. -- instead of a limousine.

However, time was running out. The good occasion they once waited for was soon to pass.

That was when Wu got the idea -- "Let's have this wedding right here right now!"

Though all the elaborate preparations in advance meant nothing now, the couple's improvisational ceremony was no less successful on the train.

"Today, we're married!" His announcement attracted a storm of warm applause and blessings from all the passengers in the blistering cold afternoon.

Wedding candies not in their pockets, Wu and his friends had to hand round all the cigarettes they had to their special attendees as presents.

Two days later, Wu's families squeezed in front of a little camera, watching the couple's wedding ceremony with smiles and sighs. "Wow, look at that! It was so crowded on the train!"

The couple were not alone in tying the knot on the road.

After being stranded in the snow for five days, Hu Yuan and his bride Ren Wen'e held the wedding ceremony in a long-distance bus going to Hu's hometown in south China's Anhui province on January 24.

With snacks as cake, a red cloth as a veil, the couple's ceremony was a cheap but fun one with the participation of all passengers on the bus.

In a picture taken by a friend, Hu held his bride closely and kissed her on the forehead under a scarlet quilt.

Source: Xinhua



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