Newsletter
Weather
Community
English home Forum Photo Gallery Features Newsletter Archive   About US Help Site Map
China
World
Opinion
Business
Sci-Edu
Culture/Life
Sports
Photos
 Services
- Newsletter
- Online Community
- China Biz Info
- News Archive
- Feedback
- Voices of Readers
- Weather Forecast
 RSS Feeds
- China 
- Business 
- World 
- Sci-Edu 
- Culture/Life 
- Sports 
- Photos 
- Most Popular 
- FM Briefings 
 Search
 About China
- China at a glance
- China in brief 2004
- Chinese history
- Constitution
- Laws & regulations
- CPC & state organs
- Ethnic minorities
- Selected Works of Deng Xiaoping
English websites of Chinese embassies




Home >> World
UPDATED: 09:09, February 04, 2007
U.S. top nuclear envoy expects "real changes" in six-party talks
font size    

Christopher Hill, U.S. chief negotiator for the six-party talks, said Saturday that he expects "some real changes" in next week's six-party talks.

"I am not going to get into specific elements, but I think we need to see some real changes on the ground," Hill, who is also the assistant secretary of State, told reporters upon his arrival at the Incheon International Airport.

"We've had a lot of consultations for this round, and reasonably we can make some progress," Hill said. "Let's see if some of those useful, substantive conversations we've had can be put to use in negotiations."

"I think we have to go from having various declarations to having agreement on implementation," Hill added. "So I am looking for some implementation of the September 2005 agreement, meaning something changes on the ground."

Diplomats from China, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), the United States, South Korea, Russia and Japan will gather in Beijing next Wednesday to launch the third session of the fifth round of the six-party talks on the nuclear issues on the Korean Peninsula.

Hill will stay in South Korea until next Monday to fine-tune a strategy for the negotiation with Seoul and then fly to Japan.

At a joint statement adopted in the fourth round of the six- party talks on Sept. 19 2005, DPRK agreed to drop its nuclear weapon program in exchange for security guarantee, economic aids and normalization of diplomatic ties with the United States. However, the statement has not been implemented so far.

Source: Xinhua


Comments on the story Comment on the story Recommend to friends Tell a friend Print friendly Version Print friendly format Save to disk Save this


   Recommendation
- Text Version
- RSS Feeds
- China Forum
- Newsletter
- People's Comment
- Most Popular
 Related News
Dic

Manufacturers, Exporters, Wholesalers - Global trade starts here.
Versions:
Copyright by People's Daily Online, all rights reserved