Newsletter
Weather
Community
English home Forum Photo Gallery Features Newsletter Archive   About US Help Site Map
China
World
Opinion
Business
Sci-Edu
Culture/Life
Sports
Photos
 Services
- Newsletter
- Online Community
- China Biz Info
- News Archive
- Feedback
- Voices of Readers
- Weather Forecast
 RSS Feeds
- China 
- Business 
- World 
- Sci-Edu 
- Culture/Life 
- Sports 
- Photos 
- Most Popular 
- FM Briefings 
 Search
 About China
- China at a glance
- China in brief 2004
- Chinese history
- Constitution
- Laws & regulations
- CPC & state organs
- Ethnic minorities
- Selected Works of Deng Xiaoping

Home >> Life
UPDATED: 08:27, August 28, 2006
Zimbabwe to launch first traditional medicine course
font size    

The Traditional Medical Practitioners Council of Zimbabwe will launch a diploma course next month, the first of its kind which is opened for clinic operators of the country's traditional medicine, an official said on Sunday.

The council registrar Mutsa Chikede said the course starting on September 18 would be for practicing healers and school leavers who are enthusiastic about the traditional medicine.

"We want to train people to be able to identify, prepare and package traditional medicine," he said, adding that the course would include patient monitoring, basic human anatomy and physiology.

He said the first module would deal with the management of herbal clinics while the second would include herbal garden management, followed by good manufacturing practices, introduction to traditional medicine, sociology of traditional medicine, home- based care and traditional research methodology.

He said those already practicing would take one year to complete the course while school leavers would take two years. The Zimbabwe government has adopted a deliberate policy to develop traditional medicine into the mainstream health delivery system. While the majority of people in Zimbabwe rely on traditional medicine, most consult the practitioners under cover of the dark due to the stigma associated with the practice.

The former colonizers caused the stigma, as they discouraged people from following traditional practices, describing them as pagan and evil, Chikede said.

Source: Xinhua


Comments on the story Comment on the story Recommend to friends Tell a friend Print friendly Version Print friendly format Save to disk Save this


   Recommendation
- Text Version
- RSS Feeds
- China Forum
- Newsletter
- People's Comment
- Most Popular
 Related News
- Malaysia recognizes Czech medical degrees: report

Dic

Manufacturers, Exporters, Wholesalers - Global trade starts here.
Copyright by People's Daily Online, all rights reserved