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Home >> China
UPDATED: 09:51, February 28, 2006
Taiwan's Chen abolishes unification council, guidelines
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Taiwan leader Chen Shui-bian announced in Taipei Monday afternoon a decision to stop the operation of the "National Unification Council (NUC)" and application of the "National Unification Guidelines".

Chen declared the decision soon after the so called "Meeting of National Security Council".

Taiwan's major parties, including Chinese Kuomintang, the People First Party and Non-Partisan Solidarity Union, major associations and other social circles had strongly opposed and criticized Chen's proposal before he took the action.

On Sunday, a senior official from the Taiwan Work Office of the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee and the Taiwan Affairs Office of the State Council criticized Chen for escalating secessionist activities, which will inevitably result in a serious crisis in the Taiwan Straits and destroy peace and stability in the Asia-Pacific region.

The official pledged that the mainland will continue to, with utmost sincerity and biggest efforts, safeguard and promote peaceful and stable development of cross-Straits relations to strive for peaceful reunification.

"We'll never tolerate 'Taiwan independence' nor allow Taiwan secessionist activities to separate Taiwan from the motherland," the official said.

On May 20, 2000, Chen promised not to declare "Taiwan Independence," not to incorporate the "two states" idea into the "constitution," not to c